ARCHAEOLOGY AND HISTORY

COURSES

Welcome to our new range of online archaeology and history courses for autumn 2021.

This term we are offering a variety of courses covering the Romans in Sussex, the origins and influence of the Vikings, food and feasting from Neanderthals to the Tudors, life, death, work and leisure in Victorian England, and the natural and human landscapes of Sussex.

 

All courses will be held on zoom to allow as many people to join in as possible.  What will you learn this autumn? 

David Rudling Photo.png

Dr David Rudling FSA, MCIfA is the Academic Director of the Sussex School of Archaeology. He is also an Honorary Research Fellow and Visiting Lecturer at the University of Roehampton.

Previously David worked for 25 years for the UCL Field Archaeology Unit, before switching to the University of Sussex where he was Senior Lecturer in Archaeology (Continuing Education). David’s research interests include Roman rural settlements and land-use, religion and ritual in Roman Britain and beyond, and ancient and medieval coins. Sites excavated by David include Bignor Roman Villa, two Romano-British farmsteads on Beachy Head, and two Romano-British temples inside Chanctonbury Ring. David’s publications include Downland Settlement and Land-use, The Archaeology of the Brighton Bypass and co-authorship of Bignor Roman Villa (with Miles Russell) and The South-East to AD 1000 (with Peter Drewett and Mark Gardiner). David is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London, a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists and Chairman of the Brighton & Hove Archaeological Society. 

Romans in Sussex

10 week online course, Mondays 10am-12pm

Starts 20th September 2021

Zoom 

£90

This course will introduce participants to aspects of the archaeology of Sussex immediately before and during the Roman period (AD 43-410). We will consider historical sources,  the ‘Conquest’ of Claudius, the client kingdom of Togidubnus, the Flavian Palace at Fishbourne, the tribal civitas capital at Chichester, other nucleated settlements, roads, villas, farmsteads, field systems and farming, industry, the army, religion, burial practices and the ‘End of Roman Sussex’. These topics will be discussed from the perspectives of both the Romans and the native population.

The Victorian World:
Life, death, work and leisure in nineteenth century England 
Part One

5 week online course, Wednesdays 7-9pm

Starts 3rd November 2021

Zoom 

£45

We study the worlds of the wealthy, middle and working classes - from large country estates and town houses to humble cottages and London rookeries of the residuum; their social and cultural life, living and working conditions. We see the strict hierarchy which existed “below stairs” and domestic life of servants and their duties in large houses. Course themes include the poor and their lack of amenities, deficient nutrition and medical attention and the effects on their appalling lives. One session will be on the fascinating rituals of death and mourning (not morbid).    

Sarah Tobias was an Associate Tutor for CCE at the University of Sussex until the department closed. She is an experienced and sympathetic adult education tutor, social, cultural and local historian and an established, experienced university lecturer, college tutor, public speaker (over 30 topics) and tour guide. 

 

She has a Diploma in European Humanities, BA Hons in History and European Humanities, Master's Degree in Histories and Cultures and Certificates in Further Education Teaching.

Her particular interest and research is in the role of female servants and domestic service, especially in 19c-early 20c great country houses. Sarah also writes and is an occasional dramatic narrator, costumed role player, playwright and filmmaker.

Dr Judie English, FSA, MCIfA

Judie's early involvement in archaeology was in excavation and that continued for many years but eventually she became more concerned with what went on beyond the trench and undertook training in analytical survey and landscape archaeology. That has meant working on wildly differing sites, including hillforts and 19th century military earthworks. But her main interest lies with land use and management in the Bronze Age and that has been underpinned by a doctoral study of field systems under the supervision of the late Peter Drewett. She has also undertaken research into Wealden settlement, particularly during the Late Saxon and Early medieval periods, using both place-names and regressive map analysis to identify early holdings. Much of this work has been published in various peer-reviewed journals.

Judie  taught ‘A’ level archaeology at Collyer’s College, Horsham and various modules for CCE at Sussex University, the WEA and other bodies.

The Vikings

5 week online course, Tuesdays 7-9pm

Starts 21st September 2021

Zoom 

£45

Our understanding of the importance of the Vikings has changed fundamentally over the past few decades and it is now recognised that their influence underpins the transfer of power from the Mediterranean area to North-West Europe.

This course will examine their origins in the Scandinavian Bronze Age and then follow them as they travelled westwards to America, southwards to Sicily and eastwards through Russia to the Islamic Caliphate in the Middle East.

Food and Feasting

5 week online course, Tuesdays 7-9pm

Starts 2nd November 2021

Zoom 

£45

We all need to eat but meals are often ‘occasions’, with ‘special’ dishes, rare and expensive foods and formal surroundings.

 

‘Feasting’ usually involves food provided in surplus and consumed wastefully.  The giver both proves his wealth and status, and creates a debt owed by his guests.  Having demonstrated his superiority those guests either have to reciprocate in kind or accept public humiliation.

 

This course will look at food and feasting from the days of Homo Neanderthalensis to the Late Medieval / Early Tudor period and will consider the relationships between food and social culture.

Dr Judie English, FSA, MCIfA

Judie's early involvement in archaeology was in excavation and that continued for many years but eventually she became more concerned with what went on beyond the trench and undertook training in analytical survey and landscape archaeology. That has meant working on wildly differing sites, including hillforts and 19th century military earthworks. But her main interest lies with land use and management in the Bronze Age and that has been underpinned by a doctoral study of field systems under the supervision of the late Peter Drewett. She has also undertaken research into Wealden settlement, particularly during the Late Saxon and Early medieval periods, using both place-names and regressive map analysis to identify early holdings. Much of this work has been published in various peer-reviewed journals.

Judie  taught ‘A’ level archaeology at Collyer’s College, Horsham and various modules for CCE at Sussex University, the WEA and other bodies.

Dr. Geoffrey Mead was born raised and educated in Brighton where his family has long been settled. After an undistinguished secondary school education, he eventually took a Geography BA at Sussex followed by an MA in Local & Regional History and in 2012 he achieved a PhD in Geography looking at Brighton's interwar suburbia. Geoffrey taught in adult education at Sussex from 1984-2012 on the Landscape Studies degree and for 12 years taught with the Geography team on a part-time basis organising the local field work courses.

 

Geoffrey does a range of talks and guided walks for WEA, U3A the WI and many local interest groups, as well as an annual series for Brighton Festival Fringe where this year he took 30 walks over 5 weekends. Geoffrey and his wife have a cottage in NW Wales where they escape to, albeit infrequently.

Landscapes of Sussex

1 day online course, 10am-4pm

Saturday 20th November 2021

Zoom 

£22.50

This course looks at the rocks and soils of the county and how they influenced what could be grown and stocked, what could be utilised for trade and industry, where people could live and what type of society developed on different landscapes. We look at Downland and Weald, coastlines east and west, as well as the human landscape of settlements.

An Introduction to the Aegean Bronze Age

8 week online course, Thursdays 7-9pm

Starts 30th September 2021

Zoom 

£72

This course introduces participants to the Bronze Age on Crete (the Minoans), mainland Greece (the Mycenaeans) and Troy, from the end of the Neolithic period (c.3000 BC) through various stages of palatial and warrior societies, to the sudden collapse of the Mycenaean civilisation in c.1100 BC.

 

Serious study of the Aegean Bronze Age began over 120 years ago, and excavation of the sites turned archaeologists like Schliemann, Evans and Marinatos into household names.  Stunning architecture, sculpture, frescoes, weaponry, ceramics, and jewellery were revealed.  As a result of the excavation processes, the mythical (or otherwise) status of Agamemnon, Odysseus, the Minotaur, the Trojan War and Atlantis were all called into question.

The Minoans and Mycenaeans themselves left us with the intriguing Greek Bronze Age sites of Knossos, Mycenae ‘Rich in Gold’, Pylos and Akrotiri, to name just a few.

We will look at these and other sites in the Aegean, combining myth, history, and archaeology in our quest to discover the people of the Minoan and Mycenaean worlds.

Sarah Green initially studied Ancient History and Archaeology at Manchester University.  After a gap of some years, she returned to study on a part-time basis and completed a Certificate in Practical Archaeology through the adult education department at Sussex University.  Postgraduate studies resulting in an MA in Classical Civilisation with the Open University and then an MA in Osteoarchaeology at the University of Southampton furthered enthusiasm.  These studies then led on to the teaching of a number of adult education courses and day schools, notably in the areas of animal bones, human skeletal remains, Maritime archaeology and the Aegean Bronze Age.

 

Alongside the ‘day job’ of Educational Administration, Sarah is the 'Keeper of the Keys' of Bramber Castle, a co-founder of the University of Sussex Archaeology Society and a Practitioner of the Chartered Institute for Archaeology.  She has travelled extensively around Crete investigating many of the Minoan sites on the island. She has also visited the Bronze Age Mycenaean sites in the Peloponnese on mainland Greece and ancient Troy in Turkey.  She divides her time between Bramber in Sussex and Mochlos in Crete.

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